Tag Archives: Brian Stelter

Talking about the “Future of Journalism”

There has been a lot said about the “future of journalism.” What will it look like? Who is part of the conversation? Which outlets will survive?

The changes that this industry has seen in the past 10 years are significant. Much like the invention of the printing press or radio or television, the shift to online news impacts delivery and consumption of news in direct ways. It changes the advertising dollars, which changes the budgets, which causes adjustments in staffing. And that’s just a start.

For my final project in for Fundamentals of Digital Journalism class in which I am currently enrolled, I intend to talk with people who are part of this moving target, as well as some who are watching and analyzing it. I want to answer the question, “What is the future of journalism, and how is digital impacting traditional media?”

Justin Ellis, an editor at The Nieman Lab, writes about and gives lectures this topic often. I have already been in touch with Ellis, and he has agreed to talk with me about this.

Additionally, I spoke briefly with Rafat Ali, CEO of Skift. Ali has never been one to mute his mouth regarding media, and he has recently posted a few articles about his current thoughts on the future of journalism. As someone who has started two niche media companies, paidContent before Skift, Ali has personal experience in how this industry is changing and moving online.

I would like to bring Hilary Sargent of Boston.com into the conversation, as well as Andrea Courtois of WBZ-TV. It would be great if I could also get interviews with Brian Stelter and David Folkenflik, but I’m not going to hold my breath on those.

From now until the day it’s due, I will likely be asking anyone and everyone I know in journalism what their thoughts are, and I will plan to include as many of those thoughts as possible.

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10 Tweeps to follow

Editor’s note: As part of my master’s class, I have been asked to write about ten Twitter accounts I find helpful to my beat. My beat, in this case, is media.

In no particular order:

Brian Stelter @brianstelter – Brian Stelter is CNN’s senior media correspondent and hosts CNN’s show, “Reliabale Sources.” He used to work at The New York Times. Brian also wrote the book, “Top of the Morning.”

David Carr @carr2n – David Carr writes the Media Equation for The New York Times.

David Folkenflik @davidfolkenflik – David Folkenflik is the media correspondent for NPR. Until recently he was following me. I hope it wasn’t something I said.

David Cohn @Digidave – David Cohn is Chief Content Officer and Founding Editor at Circa, and is previously of Spot.Us.

Jay Rosen @jayrosen_nyu – Jay Rosen is a journalism professor at New York University. He is often critical of the media, both print and broadcast.

Jeff Jarvis @jeffjarvis – Jeff Jarvis is a professor at City University of New York’s Graduate School of Journalism, directing its new media program. He seems to always be on Twitter and is not one to hold his tongue.

(Jim) Romenesko @romenesko – Jim Romenesko has a media blog in which he provides both news and commentary.

Lost Remote @lostremote – Lost Remote is a blog all about social TV. (Another good one to follow is @corybe, now of @breakingnews, but who co-founded Lost Remote.

Nieman Journalism Lab @niemanlab – The Nieman Lab evaluates media and where the industry and its culture are headed.

Poynter. @Poynter – In St. Petersburg, Florida, Poynter is a journalism school and clearing house for debates on journalistic ethics.

I have a Twitter list of these accounts plus some others. You can find that here.